Sunday, 9 July 2017

Kreuz Market in Lockhart

In 1999, the Texas Legislature proclaimed Lockhart, TX the Barbecue Capital of Texas.  The city is home to a number of major barbecue joints and as you can imagine, there are some stories to go with them.

One of the more interesting stories is that of Kreuz Market and Smitty's Market.  Kreuz Market started out as a meat market in 1900 and moved to a new location in Lockhart 24 years later.  Kreuz remained in that location until 1999 when, during a well publicized family feud, owner Rick Schmidt moved the business to its current location and his sister Nina opened Smitty's Market in the existing building.  TV and newspaper crews were on hand as pit master Roy Perez and Lehman Schmidt dragged a metal tub of the coals from the old location to the new Kreuz Market and used them to start the fires in the new pits.  A search of Kreuz on the Texas Monthly website, www.texasmonthly.com will provide you with a few different stories by Daniel Vaughn about the family ordeal, along with a great photo of the transfer of the coals.

After my meal at Franklin I drove around Austin a little and then headed south towards Lockhart.  It is a short 35 or 40 minute drive, so when I got there I was still full from lunch.  I made my way to Kreuz Market and headed inside.  It is a large red building with a brick and metal exterior.


Keuz Market exterior


There are 3 separate areas to the interior.  You enter through a foyer into a large dining area and corridor that leads you the pit area.  On the day I was there a band was playing country music in this room.


Sunday afternoon entertainment

The corridor takes you past this dining area through a set of doors into the pit room.  In here you find a number of large, brick pits and an ordering counter.


The Kreuz Market pit room

This is where you order and pay just for your meat and where you will often find the aforementioned Roy Perez tending the pits.  Perez and his mutton chop sideburns are legendary in the Texas BBQ world.  Sadly, he was not there on this day, so my hope for a photo opportunity was foiled!  I kept it light, ordering just one of the sausages that Kreuz is famous for.

From the pit room, you go through another set of doors into the main dining room and another counter where you order your sides and drinks.  I got a soda, some bread and pickles and a cole slaw to go with my sausage.  They also have some souvenirs available, including one featuring Roy Perez and his mutton chops that says 'Love Meat Tender'.  You can check out the selection at www.kreuzmarket.com.  The dining room was busy on this Sunday afternoon.  I found a seat at one of the long tables.

On the wall in the corridor when you first come in, a sign is posted listing their traditions since 1900. The first two are 'No Barbecue Sauce' and 'No Forks'.


The Rules!


This is real Texas barbecue and they don't feel that they have anything to hide by covering it up with sauce.  The lack of forks goes back to the meat market traditions where customers would buy smoked meats from the market along with some bread to use as a vehicle for eating the meat.  Part of what has drawn me to Texas BBQ has been the tradition, so I wrapped my sausage up in my bread, added some pickles and dug in!

While I was in Lockhart, I wish that I had the time, and more importantly, the appetite to check out some of the other great spots in town.  I guess there is always next time!

Kreuz Market is one of the legendary joints that is a must stop if you are in the area.  They are a Texas Monthly Top 50 spot, and even though the current building is relatively new, they managed to transfer some of the historical feeling when they moved.  This is quality barbecue and a great atmosphere, I just hope next time I go Roy Perez will be there!

Saturday, 17 June 2017

My Cooks - Smoked Chicken Wings, May 2017


This is the first time I post about my own smoking efforts.  My current cooker is a cheap, hardware store offset smoker.  It is made of thin metal and is designed for charcoal use.  I decided a while back that I wanted to try cooking by burning just wood and not charcoal.  I was able to find a firewood supplier that sells oak, unfortunately they are located just south of Edmonton.  A few weeks back I found myself up that way on a work trip and I was able to stop in there to stock up.  Of course, the firebox on my smoker is small, so I had to cut down the wood to make it fit.

It took a bit of work to get the fire going, but I was eventually able to get the smoker up to temperature.  I had hoped to maintain a temperature of around 250 degrees.  This cook was also my first opportunity to use the iGrill temperature sensor I got for Christmas.  I picked up an ambient temperature probe for it about a month ago so mounted the probe at the far end of the cooking area and set the iGrill for a temperature range between 225 and 275 degrees.  The iGrill syncs to your smartphone with bluetooth, so you can monitor your temperatures from a distance and also receive warnings when the temperature falls outside the range you set.  You can plug in up to 4 probes at once, allowing me to monitor the temperature inside the smoker as well as up to 3 different pieces of meat.

I wanted to test things out with something fairly simple and quick, so I opted for some chicken wings.  Something else I tried out for the first time was brining.  Austin's favourite Hardcore Carnivore, Jess Pryles, has posted a recipe for some buffalo chicken tenders that she brined in a buttermilk and hot sauce mixture.  I modified the recipe a little, adding just a few dashes of the hot sauce since I'm the only one in my family that likes spicy food.  My schedule only allowed me to have the wings in the brine for a few hours, so I don't know how much it added, but they did stay moist.  An overnight brine the next time should help even more.  I pulled the wings out of the brine, added some seasoning and onto the smoker they went.


Brined, seasoned and ready for some smoke!


I put a foil pan filled with water on the grill, closest to the firebox to keep more moisture in the cooker as well.  The lid on my smoker doesn't seal very tight, but I have found that a couple of paving stones on top of the lid helps keep it closed a little better!
I mentioned that I was trying to cook with just wood for the first time and I did find it quite a challenge to keep the temperature within my desired range and I was constantly having to adjust the dampers.

I let the wings cook for about 2 hours before checking on them.  The ones closer to the firebox were certainly more cooked than the others.  I moved them around a bit and at this point I slid meat probes into a couple of the wings and closed the lid for a while longer.  After another 45 minutes or so I was comfortable that the wings were cooked.  The problem with doing chicken at a lower temperature like this is that the skin doesn't crisp up.  That may be ok on a whole chicken where you can just not eat the skin, but that doesn't really work on wings!

I pulled the wings off the smoker, tossed them in some barbecue sauce and put them in the oven at high heat to crisp them up.


Smoked BBQ Wings

The Outcome: They were tasty.  Good, but not great.  I actually found the smoke flavour to be overpowering.

Next time out I will try a couple of things differently.  As I mentioned earlier, I'll brine them overnight and the other thing I'll try is to just have them on the smoker for about an hour to get some smoke flavour on the meat, but then I will finish them either on the grill or in the oven.

My other takeaway from this cook is that I need to spend more time figuring out how to maintain a steady temperature using strictly wood for fuel as opposed to charcoal.  Hopefully I can find an afternoon soon to just fire up the smoker and play around with holding the temp.  I also have some modifications in mind for it that hopefully will help.

I'll keep you all posted and I'll have some other posts up soon on some previous cooks!

Wednesday, 7 June 2017

Franklin

The famous Franklin sign


Aaron Franklin.  In just a few short years, the name has become synonymous with barbecue excellence.  His restaurant in Austin is as famous for its brisket as it is for the daily hours long lineup to get a taste of it.  They insist on using only the highest quality meats and smoke that brisket for up to 18 hours.

Reading Franklin's book, Franklin Barbecue - a meat smoking manifesto, you find out that the insistence on using only the best extends to the post oak used to slow smoke that marvellous meat.  Aaron worked tirelessly in his early days of business to find a wood supplier that could consistently provide him with the best possible product.  The attention to detail starts with the wood and the fire and extends to every process of the cook.

The day before, while in Taylor, I bought a cheap folding camp chair at Walmart.  I planned to be in line early Sunday morning and I didn't want to stand or sit on the ground.  The evening before, I had stopped by the Franklin location on my way to Stiles Switch, just to check out the spot and the parking situation.  At that point I noticed that they have a corral full of camp chairs for the guests to use while in line.  Luckily the chair only cost $10, so not a big deal!

I set my alarm for early Sunday morning and grabbed a couple of pastries, a yogurt and an apple from the hotel continental breakfast on my way out the door.  Franklin talks about the daily line up in his book and I had been reading about it on Twitter for months.  The line up has its own Twitter feed and I had heard stories of people paying others to stand in line for them.  It was also a weekend, so the line up would be longer than on a weekday.  From what I had heard and read, I expected the line up to start 4 or 5 hours before the 11:00 am opening.  I pulled into the parking lot about 6:30 am...crickets.  Nobody in sight.  Not another car in the parking lot.  My immediate thought was that I could have slept more.  I stayed in the car and ate my breakfast.  Within 10 or 15 minutes, two other cars pulled, much to my relief!  I finished my yogurt, grabbed a chair from the corral and got into the lineup.  6:45 am and I was the third chair in line!


6:45 a.m. The view of the door from my spot in line


The folks ahead of me were a husband and wife from Connecticut.  She had been to Franklin before but this was his first time.  The other car was a younger couple from a little ways outside Austin.  He was headed off to Arizona for school and wanted to hit Franklin one more time before going away, so he and his girlfriend had made a weekend trip.  You see, the Franklin lineup has kind of become a thing of its own.  I mentioned the Twitter feed.  They have a sign on the wall letting guests know that the line is BYOB friendly.  As the line grew longer and longer that morning, people were making a social event out of it.  A young couple a little ways back from my spot in line were drinking bloody mary's.  They had recently moved to Austin from Florida and spent a good amount of time talking with two guys ahead of them in line about the local bbq scene.  Groups were using their coolers for card games.  It was a really neat scene.  Around 8 o'clock the staff turned on some music and shortly after someone came out to let us know that a door was unlocked and we could go in to use the washroom if needed.  The cash was also open for those wanting to buy souvenirs prior to opening (hat and t-shirt added to the collection!).



Pictures of the growing line up


The great thing that they do is around 9:00 or 9:30, a staff member comes out and starts going person by person through the lineup, taking an inventory of what everyone figures they will be ordering, and how much.  Using this info, they will cut off the line at some point, letting anyone beyond that point know that they will likely not get any food that day.  The downside of low and slow cooked barbecue is that when it is all gone, it is all gone.  There is no throwing a few more steaks on the grill.  Since opening the restaurant around 2010, Franklin Barbecue has sold out of barbecue every day.  The previous day's sold out sign was still up on the door when I got there.  Closer to opening time, someone else came out selling beer and a few times during the line up staff came out, greeting the guests, answering questions and making sure everyone was doing ok.  From a business model standpoint, I would say they have about mastered the whole guest experience thing.  The lineup creates a buzz of its own and their actions help make it a fun, friendly and social experience.

With all of that said however, the lineup and the buzz would not exist without the food.  If the barbecue wasn't any good, none of it would happen.  The lineups started before Franklin had moved into the current building.  The restaurant started out as a trailer that Aaron and his wife Stacy had built into a food truck.  Shortly after opening, Daniel Vaughn gave them a glowing review and the rest is history!

A few minutes before 11:00, the chairs made their way back into the corral and we stood, eagerly awaiting the main door being unlocked.  Finally, it was time.  After almost 4.5 hours in line, I will admit that I was a little bit giddy with anticipation!


Just moments before opening!


The door opened and in we went, along the back wall and past the souvenir display and then down the side wall up to the counter to order.  I placed my order, watching the cutter expertly slice the brisket and pork ribs that I ordered.  A side of baked beans, white bread and pickles on the side along with a mini pecan pie for dessert.


My Franklin spread.


I joined the Connecticut couple at a table and it was time to eat.  The previous day, I had eaten brisket at two of the finest BBQ joints in Texas and it was outstanding.  Somehow, this was just a little bit better.  It is tough to explain just how, but it was.  It is also difficult to explain how a simple piece of bbq meat is worth waiting 4.5 hours in line for, but it was.  The pork ribs were outstanding in their own right, but the brisket was the star of the show.  Franklin uses a 50/50 salt and pepper rub on the brisket and it is elegant in its simplicity.  The beans were good, the pie was excellent (not house made, they bring it in from a local bakery), but the rest of the meal was overshadowed by the fabulousness of the brisket.


I'm happy to say that I have experienced the Franklin line, and I would absolutely eat there again...just not sure I'll wait 4.5 hours in line again. The food was outstanding and the whole experience was first rate.  In 2013, Texas Monthly named them the top BBQ joint in Texas and the new rankings released just a couple of weeks ago have them at number 2.  In my mind, they are undeniably deserving of such lofty status and braving the Franklin line up is a BBQ bucket list item I'm happy to cross off my list!


Thursday, 25 May 2017

My Ultimate Texas BBQ Trip, February 2017 - Day 1, Stop 3, Stiles Switch

After breakfast at Snow's and lunch at Louis Mueller, I rolled into Austin and got myself checked into my hotel.  I crashed for a bit of an afternoon nap before heading out once again.

I had a couple of items on my agenda to take care of on my way to Stiles Switch.  One of the Austinites I follow on Twitter is Jess Pryles.  She is a barbecue aficionado and her website, www.jesspryles.com has some cool swag, and I was hoping to pick up one of her Hardcore Carnivore t-shirts.  The website listed a local store as one of the places carrying her items so I stopped in there.  Unfortunately, all they carry are her rubs, so no luck there.

My next stop was to scout out the location for my next day's adventure, but more on that in the next blog post!  From there I headed for Stiles Switch...at least that was the plan.  My phone GPS was giving me trouble and I ended up missing my exit...causing me a substantial detour and some frustration.

I finally found my way to the restaurant and headed into Stiles Switch BBQ & Brew.  The restaurant is relatively new, but it is located in one of the oldest shopping centres in Central Austin.  Their website says that the location was used for filming the movie Dazed & Confused back in the 90's.  The decor reminded me of an old roadhouse.  Lots of wood and neon, tv's on the walls.  Simple wooden tables and some larger communal bar height tables.  You enter at one end of the large room and an aisle takes you along the wall up to the counter at the opposite end.  Being my third stop of the day, I decided to go for a lighter option and went with the smoked turkey breast along with pork ribs, coleslaw and potato salad (not really a light option...just lighter!).  The usual white bread and pickles along with a side of sauce and I was good to go.

Stiles Switch BBQ & Brew - smoked turkey & ribs

The ribs were very good, although I did find the bark to be a bit on the peppery side.  The sides were great.  The turkey was good, but a little on the dry side.  Stiles Switch was just named one of the 50 bbq joints in Texas in the new Texas Monthly ranking, so I'm going to assume that either I caught them on an off day or it was the fact that it was my third bbq restaurant of the day, combined with being tired and frustrated at getting lost on the way.  Other than the dry turkey, I can't really point to anything wrong, but I was left wanting more.  Given the circumstances and all the good things I've read about them, I feel like I owe them a second visit.  I'm pretty certain it was just me, so don't hesitate to check them out if you have the opportunity.

I had planned to check out some of the Austin nightlife, but after eating I just made my way back to the hotel (with another brief faulty GPS related detour) and crashed for the night.



Sunday, 21 May 2017

My Ultimate Texas BBQ Trip, February 2017 - Day 1, Stop 2, Louie Mueller BBQ

After my almost surreal breakfast experience at Snow's (see my previous post, Day 1, Stop 1), I hit the road and made the drive to Taylor.  The drive took 30 or 40 minutes and was quite a nice drive through the countryside.  This is the Texas hill country, so lots of rolling hills and farms.  The area had been hit by some storms and tornadoes recently, and I saw some evidence of this with debris in the fields.  The region must also be susceptible to flash flooding, because the low spots on the road had signs or poles alongside to show the depth of the water.

When I rolled into Taylor, I wasn't quite ready for lunch, so I hit the local Walmart for a few things and mostly just to wander around and walk off breakfast!  After putting in as much time as I could at Walmart, I stopped to gas up my rental before making my way over to Louie Mueller.  There was a line up almost to the door when I walked in.  It felt good to be back there and I took the time in the line up to reacquaint myself with the interior decor and also chatted with the folks in front of me.  They were visiting from the Dallas area for a ball tournament.  They must have snuck away early from the tournament to get in line, because before long the place was packed!  Once again, my timing was near perfect.  While in line, pitmaster/owner Wayne Mueller passed by and stopped to say hello once again, remembering me from our meeting earlier that morning.  I was feeling like a bit of a celebrity!!

Saturday line-up at Louis Mueller

I kept it minimal at the counter, remembering the beef rib incident from last time!  Moist brisket, a jalapeño sausage, a side of beans and of course, banana pudding!  Some bread, pickles and sauce on the side and I was good to go.

Heaven on a tray!

The brisket was excellent as usual.  One of the main things that separates the great bbq spots from the rest is the ability to consistently produce excellent quality meats.  Louie Mueller is able to do this with their brisket, and it is a thing of true beauty!  I found the jalapeño sausage to be spicier than on my two earlier visits, but perhaps I was just a little heat sensitive that day, because I also found the beans quite spicy.  They were tasty, but I think I'll just stick with the potato salad next time around.  I took my time eating, enjoying the surroundings and the hustle and bustle of the place.  It was a busy day and the people just kept coming.  I finished off my meal with that delicious banana pudding, an awesome end to a great meal.

I hoped to get the chance to talk to Wayne Mueller again and ask about the possibility of going back to see the pits, but he was busy visiting with some other folks.  Next time maybe!

I got back in the car and pointed it towards Austin for the next stop in my little adventure.

Saturday, 6 May 2017

My Ultimate Texas BBQ Trip, February 2017 - Day 1, Stop 1, Snow's BBQ

This past February (2017) I once again found myself in Houston for work on a 9 day trip...this is starting to sound familiar.  The company I work for has an office in Houston and our guy there takes his vacation at this time every year, so someone from Calgary goes down to man the shop while he's away.  This was the third time in four years that I was that guy, but I'm not complaining.  These trips have given me the opportunity to eat some of the best barbecue anywhere and the experiences on my weekend trip this past February are what inspired me to start writing this blog.

This blog is as much a way for me to preserve the memories for myself as it is a way to share with others.  I've said it previously, but the culture of barbecue isn't just about the food.  The history and the stories of the people and places are a big part of what intrigues and interests me.  Once again, I must throw out a thank you to Daniel Vaughn and www.tmbbq.com for bringing many of the stories of Texas barbecue to my attention.

One of those stories is that of Tootsie Tomanetz and Snow's BBQ.  At the age of 81, Tootsie is the pitmaster at Snow's, in the small town of Lexington, TX, in the heartland of Texas barbecue called the Hill Country.  They are only open one day a week, on Saturdays, and they open up bright and early at 8 am.  And so it was, that on this Saturday morning in February I was in my rental car and headed out once again from Houston on Hwy 290 , but this time with a different first stop on my journey than on my two previous trips up this highway.  I arrived in Lexington a little after 8:30 and followed the signs to the small, red, cabin looking building that houses the joint that in 2008 was named the Best BBQ in Texas.

I was about to learn that barbecue for breakfast at Snow's on Saturday mornings is a bit of thing.  Walking from my car to get in line, a gentlemen walked by me going the other way that looked familiar to me.  I got in line and a few minutes later he returned and joined the group in front of me.  At this time I will admit to eavesdropping a little on their conversation!  After a couple of minutes I realized that I did recognize him and it was indeed Daniel Vaughn, with whom I had been tweeting with just the day before to find out what time I should be there to make sure I didn't miss out.

He and his group were busy talking so I didn't want to interrupt, so I waited for the right moment (very Canadian of me, I know!).  As I waited in line I took in the surroundings.  The pits are located outside under a tin roof that also provides cover to a large seating area.  Two or three large wood fired offset smokers and a number of direct heat metal pits were being manned by the one and only Tootsie.  As I looked over at the pits, I saw another familiar face.  Tootsie was visiting with none other than Wayne Mueller from Louie Mueller in nearby Taylor.



Outside seating area at Snow's


Before long, he came over and chatted with Daniel for a few minutes.  After they were done talking I introduced myself to Wayne and was thrilled and surprised when he said that he'd been reading my tweets!  I hadn't expected that it was him that managed the restaurant's Twitter account...pretty cool.  We chatted for a minute and I told him that I was heading to his place after this.  By this time I had just about reached the door to enter inside and I had the opportunity to say hello to Daniel.  He also recognized me from our Twitter conversations and we had a brief conversation and I asked him what he recommended off the menu here.  He suggested the pork steak, one of their specialties.

I got inside the swinging door.  On my right was a display of t-shirts and souvenirs for sale and on the left was the serving counter.  I placed my order of some brisket, a rib and the recommended pork steak and paid for my tray along with a banana pudding, a t-shirt and a souvenir cup.  It isn't a large space.  Beside the t-shirt display is the counter where get your white bread, pickles, etc.  There is a drink machine along with tea and sweet tea dispensers and a cooler full of ice.  Six or eight large wooden tables with benches fill up the rest of the indoor dining area.  I found a spot at a table with a family already eating and sat down to bbq for breakfast!


Snow's brisket, pork steak and a rib with white bread and pickles on the side, with banana pudding for dessert!



I can't really say that any one of the meats I ordered was better than the other...it was all outstanding.  The brisket was as good as any I had eaten to that point, the rib was perfect and the pork steak was an incredibly pleasant surprise (thanks again Daniel).  I finished off my meal with a delectable banana pudding.  After eating and refilling my cup with sweet tea on ice, I chatted briefly again with Mr. Vaughn.  He mentioned that there was a group of BBQ people doing a tour of some of the area's many great spots and he provided some recommendations of other spots to visit.  It was a true pleasure to meet Daniel and I appreciate the chance to thank him for all the great reads.

I then headed outside to have a look around the outside seating an pit area.  The owner of Snow's is Kerry Bexley.  He was out by the pits visiting with customers.  I said hello to him and asked if it was ok to come back and meet Tootsie.  He said it was and I wandered into the pit area to wait my turn while she was talking to someone else.  She kept working while visiting, opening the large steel pit doors, shifting links of sausage around.  When she was done I went over to introduce myself.  She was incredibly friendly and seemed to genuinely enjoy the steady stream of visitors.  We snapped a selfie and I thanked her for her time and for the incredible food.


Me and the legend, Tootsie Tomanetz


On my way out, I noticed that there were even more people from area bbq restaurants there, enjoying this Saturday morning tradition in Central Texas.  If you want to read more about Tootsie and this great place, go to www.tmbbq.com/snows-queen.  It is a beautifully written essay about the life of a remarkable women.

Saturday, 29 April 2017

Texas Tour Two - Part 3, Killen's BBQ, February 2016

It was a beautiful, sunny, Saturday morning in Houston, and it was the last day of my trip.  My flight didn't leave until late afternoon though, so that meant I had time for one more barbecue visit.  Prior to my trip, I had been hearing a lot of buzz about Killen's Barbecue, just to the south of Houston in Pearland, so I decided that it would be the final stop for this work trip/barbecue journey.  I had been texting that week with a friend about meeting for lunch on Saturday, and it turned out that he lives in Pearland, so we made plans to meet at Killen's.  I arrived about 45 minutes before opening, parked in the back and had a peek at the smokers situated behind the restaurant before joining the line out front.



I joined the line, which was about 20 or 30 people deep at this point.  My pal Jason arrived just a few minutes later and we spent the time in line catching up on each other's lives.  Jason and I work in the same industry and have gotten to know each other over the years.  The restaurant was offering free beer to the folks in line (something fairly common I've learned), while taking donations for a charity.



Once opening time came the line moved fairly quickly, and before long we were out of the sun in the shade of the entrance canopy and then through the doors into the building.  There is a small foyer once inside that leads to the ordering counter.  We ordered our meats and sides, plus I had been tasked with bringing home a pecan pie, so I also ordered a whole pie.  On my previous trip to Houston, I had commented to my family on how good the pecan pie (my all time favourite pie by the way) was, so it was requested that I bring one home.  I had picked up a round, plastic food container at Wal-Mart earlier in the week so I was prepared.  I asked the restaurant to wrap the pie in plastic wrap for me and they were happy to oblige!  

We paid the bill and took our trays to a table.  This is a much newer building (or at least recently renovated) than some of the other places I had been to that week, so it is missing that feeling of history and tradition.  There are no Louie Mueller smoke stained walls here for sure, but the design and decor gave it a bit of an old style diner look, so it definitely had character.  There is a counter for tea and fountain drinks, and also for the usual condiments like pickles and onions.  The table contained a couple of sauce options.  Again, like at Leon's a week earlier, I didn't take a picture of my plate (over a year ago I had no idea that I would one day be writing a blog about these adventures!).  I know I had brisket and pork ribs, both of which were top notch.  The brisket at Killen's is what I had been reading about and it was easy to tell why.  Delicious bark, beautifully tender with the fat well rendered.  The ribs were on the par with the brisket.  Great bark with a good bite, the meat pulling away from the bone with just a bit of effort.  The sauces were good, with the coffee flavoured sauce having a particularly interesting taste to it.

A year later, I am trying to remember if I ordered the 2 meat plate or the 3 meat plate.  Given how memorable the brisket and ribs were, I have to think I showed a rare bit of restraint and just went with the 2 meater as I am sure I would remember a third meat if I had gone for the third.  If my memory serves me, Jason ordered brisket and pulled pork and enjoyed them both.

I've heard good things about the beef rib, so I will have to make sure I get back to Killen's on a future trip.  By the way, the pecan pie made it home safe and sound and was enjoyed by the family, although we all noted that you could taste a bit of smoke flavour in the crust.  I say Killen's BBQ is worthy of all the hype I had read about prior to my visit and continue to see.  I will be interested to see where they rank when the updated TM BBQ rankings come out soon.


Killen's is owned by Chef Ronnie Killen and is just one of the restaurants in Pearland and Houston he runs.  There is also Killen's Steakhouse, Killen's Burgers and the new Killen's STQ in Houston, next door to Roegel's BBQ.

Check out Killen's at www.killensbarbecue.com and follow them on Twitter at @killensbbq.